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Soluble immune receptor serum levels are associated with age, but not with clinical phenotype or disease severity in childhood atopic dermatitis.

September 14th, 2009 · No Comments

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Soluble immune receptor serum levels are associated with age, but not with clinical phenotype or disease severity in childhood atopic dermatitis.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2009 Sep 8;

Authors: Ott H, Wilke J, Baron JM, Höger PH, Fölster-Holst R

Abstract Background Soluble immune receptors (SIRs) have been proposed as biomarkers in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). However, their clinical applicability in affected children has rarely been studied. Objective To assess the diagnostic usefulness of serum SIRs in childhood AD by correlating the obtained receptor profiles with serological parameters and clinical features such as age, AD phenotype and disease severity. Methods We investigated 100 children with AD. The sCD14, sCD23, sCD25, sCD30, total IgE (tIgE) and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP) were determined using sera of all children. The clinical phenotype was classified as extrinsic AD (ADe) or intrinsic AD (ADi) by the presence of allergen-specific IgE antibodies. Results A total of 55 male and 45 female children were recruited. The sCD23, sCD25 and sCD30 serum levels revealed significant age-dependency. At a mean SCORAD of 40 (range 8-98), none of the evaluated SIRs was correlated to disease severity. In all, 73% of patients suffered from ADe while 27% showed the ADi phenotype. None of the analysed SIRs differed significantly between ADe and ADi patients, while tIgE and ECP levels were elevated in the ADe subgroup. Conclusion The current study provides evidence that sCD23, sCD25 and sCD30 serum levels are highly age-dependent. Serum concentrations of all investigated SIRs did not significantly correlate with disease severity in children with AD and were not differentially expressed in patients of different AD phenotypes. Therefore, we believe that the studied SIRs cannot be regarded as clinically useful biomarkers for the assessment of childhood AD.

PMID: 19744181 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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